Good at Waiting.

GW-2020-02-02-Meta-ImageHeader Large.jpg

The other day I was sick and needed to get into Urgent Care as soon as possible. I looked on line at various Urgent care locations and discovered that they posted their wait times online. I drove past 2 locations with hour+ long wait time to arrive an an urgent care with no posted wait time. Why? Because no body likes to wait. We are live in a time and place with shortest and fewest wait times. We have the lowest levels of patience when it comes to waiting. Instead of waiting, we take out our phones and do something. Waiting in faith is hard for us. 

In the gospel this Sunday we read about Simeon who the Holy Spirit had told him that he wouldn’t die until he saw the savior of Israel. He had to wait. Simeon waited day in and day out in the temple for the Lord to come. He didn’t know when Jesus was coming, but he still waited. How many little babies did Simeon hold hoping and wishing for the Messiah only to realize he had more waiting to do?

Can you imagine Simeon’s joy, delight, and exhilaration when he finally Jesus in his arms? That experience of anticipation and fulfillment must have be the core of Simeon’s faith. Yet, Simeon’s faith didn’t come from God’s fulfillment of his promise, but front he promise itself. Simeon waited in faith because he trusted God. 

Far too often when we pray we expect God to answer prayers faster than Amazon. We want what we want, when we want it, which is now. We are high-demand consumers of God’s love and goodness and we want our demands/prayers met in a timely manner. 

God knows our hearts. He knows and desires what is best for us. God responds to all prayers with either yes, no, or wait. Sometimes the waiting is the best thing that could happen to us. It is in the waiting that the Holy Spirit works. Sometimes it is in the waiting where we meat God face to face. 

LIVE IT: Find someone you trust to ask the following 4 questions:

  1. Are you good at waiting? Why or why not? 
  2. Are you waiting for anything right now?
  3. What have you learned while waiting for something?
  4. Have you ever waited for God to do something? What happened?

Sunday Readings for February 2nd, 2020.

Wait.

May 28th Sunday Readings.

Have you ever been behind someone at a traffic light that turns green and they don’t textingmove? Of course you have. It seems that often the light turns green and nobody moves because they are looking down at their phone. I have to admit I have no patience for that moment. I don’t think many of us enjoy waiting for others to move.

Yet, if we are honest with ourselves we know that there are times we are the cause of our own delay. As frustrated as I may get with a stop-light-texter, I’ve certainly been the one to hold up the whole line of cars (Also, DON’T text and drive. Don’t do it. Whatever it is, it can wait.)

In fact, I would say that more often than not, I’m the one tapping the breaks when it comes to something that asks something of me. I don’t know about you, but when I have a decision to make, it is easier for me to say, “Let’s wait,” instead of, “Let’s go!”

In the gospel this Sunday, Jesus says “Go.” Jesus gives his disciples and each and everyone of us a command to move, to go from where we are and make disciples. He doesn’t say, “Prepare more.” He doesn’t say, “After you know enough.” He doesn’t say, “After you are good enough.” He tells us to go.

Sharing that our faith matters to us and that Jesus is important in our lives isn’t always easy. And certainly we should be prudent in how we go about sharing our good news with the world. However, if we wait too long, in the name of prudence, we may never go.

This week, wherever you go, take your faith with you. Don’t leave the name of Jesus at HNOJ or the quiet of your own room. Bring Jesus to the soccer practice, ice rink, grad party, or family dinner. Go!

LIVE IT:
I dare you say the name of “Jesus” sometime this week in a positive way, in an unexpected place, and see what happens.