The Good Word for July 19th

I'm too busy to tell people I'm busy.For the complete Sunday readings click here.

Have you ever told someone you were too busy for them? I wish I didn’t, but the people in my life I probably say this to the most are my kids. I never actually say those words, but what I often do is suggest they go play outside or in the playroom or go ask mom. Rarely is what I am doing so important that I shouldn’t take the time for them. Gosh, I don’t even like admitting this truth.

The thing is God is never too busy for us. He is never too busy to hear our trivial story or complaining or good news. God is never too busy to pay attention to exactly what we are saying. God is never too busy to give us exactly what we need. Certainly he doesn’t always give us what we ask for or want, but he is never too busy for us.

However, we often treat God like he is too busy, right? We say things like, “God doesn’t care about whether I am sitting in traffic, God has bigger issues in the world.” And yes it is true that there are bigger issues than Minnesota construction traffic, but that doesn’t mean he is too busy to listen to us.

God attends to us absolutely.

In our Gospel Jesus and the Disciples are exhausted. They are so busy ministering to people they, “had no opportunity even to eat.” Yet, on their way to rest and food, the crowds follow. Jesus “moved with pity” decides to forgo his rest so minister again to the people.

The same is true in our life. Jesus never tires of ministering to us. If we turn to God, God is there. If we speak, God listens. If we listen, God is powerfully present (sometimes we have trouble hearing – another blog topic altogether).

We can trust that no matter what, God won’t abandon us. God is never to busy for you.

LIVE IT:
Hearing God’s voice in the midst of our noice is tough, but he is always there. Take 5 minutes everyday this week to sit in silence. No words. No pressure. Just 5 minutes of silence.

The Good Word for June 7th

FullSizeRender For the complete Sunday readings click here.

Kids are funny. One of my favorite kid things happens only when they are toddlers. My kids would fall down and then look up to me to see if they are okay or if they should cry. I learned quickly that if I just said, “You’re okay! Dust it off!” and smile, then my kids would be fine.

Until, of course, there is blood. If they fall and are bleeding, they know it is serious and tears are most certainly called for. How do they know? Did I accidently teach them that blood means a more serious injury? Or do they just kind of know?

With our modern medical discoveries, we know how important blood is. Blood carries oxygen and nutrients to our cells. Blood protects us from bacteria and viruses. Lose too much blood and you die. Blood is life.

Even without our medical knowledge, the Hebrew people understood the importance of blood. For them blood was sacred because it meant life and death. When Moses wanted to signify a covenant between God and the Hebrew people, he used blood because this relationship between God and his people is a life and death relationship. Moses knew that without God, his people would die.

No different for us. Without God, we die. But instead of bull’s blood, we have God’s own blood given to us by Jesus Christ. When we go to Mass, we actually consume Jesus’ body and blood in the Eucharist. We no longer sacrifice animals because Jesus has given himself as the sacrifice. That sacrifice was made on the Cross 2000 years ago, and we participate in it every time we go to Mass.

The Mass isn’t just music and words. At Mass we remember, reinforce, reestablish, renew, and recommit to our deeply intimate and profoundly powerful relationship with God. And we recommit to that covenant with God by receiving Jesus’ body and blood. It is this relationship that will save our life. Jesus shed his blood, gave his very life, so that we may have life with God forever.

Live it:
Go to Mass. Pray for a deeper desire to be close to God.