Zoned Out.

December 3rd Sunday Readings.

Do you zone out easily? To zone out is to kind of look off in the distance and think noah-silliman-136622random thoughts that don’t have much bearing on what is presently happening before you. Some people zone out in meetings or conversations or class. But when happens when the conversation partner, boss, or teacher catch us zoned out? Not good.

In the gospel, Jesus commands his disciples to be watchful and alert. Jesus invites them to be like servants who stay awake and watch, waiting for their master to return from a long journey. He goes on to warn them against the dangers of being caught asleep and unprepared. In other words, he asks his disciple not to spiritually zone out.

What does it mean to spiritual zone out? I’m not talking about zoning out during Mass, though we should work against that too, no I am talking about zoning out during the most important and impactful moments of life. I think it is easy to become the kind of people who start zoning out during boring or lifeless or even painful moments, but then start to get so good at zoning out that we start doing it during the fun, exciting, and joyful moments too. We sometimes get so good at avoiding pain by zoning out that we never truly feel joy or love because we sleepwalk through those moments too.

Advent is the season of waking up. This weekend starts the process of becoming awake and aware and watching for the abundant gifts God has in store for us. But the key is to wake up and watch. Whether you zone out independently or by mindlessly scrolling through your phone, now is the time to wake up, to watch, to breath deeply of God’s good gift of life.

Live it: Wake up by actually waking up. Don’t hit your snooze at all this week. Plan on leaping out of bed and taking 5 deep breaths right away. If that means you are up 9 minutes early, spend those 9 minutes in prayer asking God to spiritually wake you up.

I didn’t know.

November 26th Sunday Readings.

As humans we are aware of so many things. Our senses take in so much information thatMonkeys we ignore or process involuntarily most of it. We are inundated with information about our immediate environment. Through our devices, we take in more information about our world than ever before. We know so much.

Since we know so much, we can be fooled into thinking that we know all or most of what is going on around us. We can come away with the perception that we are 100% aware of our own motivations and actions, and the outcomes of those actions. We can erroneously believe we know the who, how, what, and why of everything we do.

In the gospel this Sunday Jesus explains to his disciples that at the end of time the Son of Man will separate those who loved God from those who didn’t love God. The Son of Man will be able to tell who loves God by how they treat the least in our world.

What was interesting to me was that neither the sheep or the goats knew Jesus was present in the least. The sheep loved the least without being aware that they were serving the God of the Universe while doing so. The goats didn’t realize they were ignoring their Savior when they ignored the least.

At the end of the day, anyone will be good when it profits them. All will do good for the other when it ultimately benefits themselves. But that is what goats are willing to do.

Sheep love and serve when it is of no benefit to themselves. Sheep love the least who have no way to pay back what they receive. Sheep love like Jesus. Sheep love Jesus whether they know it or not.

Live It: Make a plan to help someone in the next 7 days who can’t help you back.

Immediately.

November 19th Sunday Readings.

Are you a procrastinator? I’ll admit it, there is nothing quite like a deadline to help me procrastination.jpgcomplete my work. Part of the reason is that I like to keep my options open when it comes to tasks. What if new information comes and I’ve already done? I know that procrastination has got me in trouble more than once. Are you a procrastinator? Has procrastination ever gotten you in trouble?

In the gospel this weekend Jesus tells a parable about a Master and three servants. The Master gives an obscene amount of money to each servant while he is away. When the Master returned two of the guys have doubled their money, while the third servant has simply hidden the cash and hoped for the best. The Master praises the first two servants while the third servant is called wicked and lazy and is thrown out of the house and into the darkness.

The key to this reading for me is one word – immediately. When the Master gives the money to his servants and goes away Jesus says in the parable that, “Immediately the one who received five talents went and traded with them, and made another five. Likewise, the one who received two made another two.”

The servants who get to share in the Master’s joy don’t wait. They don’t hesitate. They don’t put off their work until tomorrow or until they feel like it or until the circumstances are better or until they get invited or until….you fill in the rest.

If we wait or hesitate we may not have time to double our money. If we wait to invest spiritually in our life or our spouse or our children, we may not have enough time for our efforts to be fruitful. If we procrastinate working with the great gift of our life that God has given us, we may not be able to share in the joy we could have if we work not.

What’s the lesson? Don’t wait! Don’t wait until tomorrow to pray, go to Confession, give forgiveness, or serve someone else. Go, now!

Live It: Take 5 minutes (right now!) to decide what can you do in the next 24 hours to grow your faith, grow closer to Jesus. Then make a plan to do it in the next 24 hours.

What we can’t share.

November 12th Sunday Readings.

What is the first lesson most of us were taught when we began school? Share. Share yourshared toys with someone who wants to play with them. Share your lunch with a kid who is still hungry. Share your time, attention, joy, good news, and yourself with those who need those things. Share.

So when Jesus tells us a parable where the good guys don’t share, it can be a little unnerving. In the gospel this weekend the wise virgins, the hero of our story, don’t share their oil with the foolish virgins who don’t bring enough with them. How rude, right?  Why would Jesus tell the parable this way?

We need to remember that this story Jesus tells is a parable, a meaningful metaphor or allegory. Often when Jesus tells a parable about a wedding feast, he is really talking about heaven.

In this particular metaphor the wise virgins don’t share because they can’t. They can’t share because the oil represents their love for the groom. The oil represents their willingness to prepare and go above and beyond in support of the groom. The foolish virgins did the bare minimum when it came to their duty, but the wise virgins did more. The wise virgins acted out of love, not fear in preparing to serve the groom.

Love is a choice each of us make. The wise virgins couldn’t make that decision for the foolish virgins. When the foolish virgins try and enter the dinner after the doors are shut the groom doesn’t say, “You weren’t there when I needed you,” or “why didn’t bring extra oil.” No, instead he says, “I don’t know you.” Entrance into the wedding feast is about knowing, loving, and serving the bridegroom.

When we are in love we don’t count the cost. When we love well, we don’t do the littlest we are able. In fact, when we love well, we don’t even ask the question, “How little can I do and still be okay?”

If we want to go to heaven, we won’t get there doing the bare minimum. We won’t get there doing just enough. If we want to go to heaven, we will only get their by love, by God’s love and our loving response.

LIVE IT: Pray this fantastic prayer by St. Ignatius Loyola for generosity.

Lord, teach me to be generous.

Teach me to serve you as you deserve;

to give and not to count the cost;

to fight and not to heed the wounds;

to toil and not to seek for rest;

to labor and not to ask for reward

save that of knowing that I do your will.

I learned it from you, Dad!

Sunday Readings for Nov. 5th.

“Do as I say and not as I do?” Have you ever heard that from a parent? Have you ever Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 11.04.57 AMsaid it as a parent? As a child of the 80’s, the anti-drug commercials from my elementary school days are permanently burned into my memory. There is one where a dad finds his son’s stash of illegal drugs and while asking his son where he learned to take “this stuff,” the son yells back, “From you, alright! I learned by watching you.” The idea behind the commercial is that even if you tell your kids not to do something, if you do it, they will likely pick it up.

In the gospel Jesus tells the crowds to act in the way that the Pharisees say to act but don’t follow their example. In other words, do as they say, not how they do. The thing is, that never really works does it?

As Christians, as Catholics, we don’t just do what Jesus says. We are called not just to follow his teaching, but to conform our lives to his life. If we are serious about being Christian Disciples, we have to live like Jesus. We have to model our behaviors off of how Jesus would have behaved.

As Catholics we also have the blessing of a whole host of Saints whom we can also model our lives off of. We can look to Saints great and small and try and live like they would in the way that they followed Jesus. We do this because we know and can trust that they modeled their lives off of Christ.

As parents, the reality is that the way we practice our faith forms our children’s ideas of how to practice their faith. The Church teaches that parents are “first teachers” of the faith. Sometimes we thinks this means that we “should” be teaching our kids the faith. But the reality is that the Church is saying that no matter what you are currently doing, that is what you “are” teaching your kids.

Faith is caught, not taught.

If your relationships with Jesus is the most important thing in your life and your daily actions reflect that, your kids will see that. If Mass, and the union with God that occurs during it, is the most important event of your weekend, your kids will see that. If you make financial and schedule decisions based on your faith, your kids will see that. My prayer for you and for me is that when I ask my kids why they are such strong disciples of Jesus, they will answers, “From you and mom, alright! I learned it from you.”

Live It: Take just 5 minutes and examine how you are currently practicing your faith (prayer, sacraments, daily life, etc.). Does it look like Jesus?